Google's Web Lab
Google's Web Lab
Google's Web Lab

Google's Web Lab

Google's Web Lab is a year long exhibition being shown in the basement of the London's Museum of Science and beamed online 24 hours a day that seeks to bring the "magic of the web to life".

Produced with the help of design studio Tellart the exhibition features five interactive installations for museum-goers and virtual visitors to engage with including the:

Universal Orchestra 

orchestra
Utilizing the latest HTML 5 WebSockets capabilities people from around the world choose one of 8 available sets of instruments (including the Steel tongue drum, Vibraphone, Kalimba, and drums) to play and collaboratively generate a truly global musical creation.


- How it works video

Data Tracer

data-tracer

This installation enables you to select an image on the web via a search bar and trace a journey along a map to exactly where that image is residing at the moment in the physical world. 

- How it works

Sketchbots

sketchbot

Upload your face via a webcam (or camera if you’re inside the museum) and a robotic arm will draw a version of you on a continually refreshed sandbox.

- How it works

Teleporter

telleporter
A series of Web-enabled periscopes that enable users to instantly transport themselves to far off locales around the world via live panoramic feeds.

- How it works

Lab Tag Explorer

lab-tag

The final installation allows you to engage with the physical and virtual visitors of the exhibition itself. View a stream of museum visitors taking part in the exhibit in London or count and monitor the incoming creations and locations of visitors taking part from their browsers on the web.

- How it works



You can join in the fun online at: chromeweblab.com (the Web Lab is a showcase for Google Chrome, so if you don’t have the browser downloaded you might not get the full experience), view the installations in action embedded below, or watch the series of "How it works" videos breaking down the technology being used in each exhibits.

Additional Coverage: New Scientist, AdWeek, Google Blog, Wired, Telegraph
Image Credits: Google, Tellart