Sensor Shirt: OMsignal

Technology woven into life
Sensor Shirt: OMsignal
Sensor Shirt: OMsignal
Sensor Shirt: OMsignal
Sensor Shirt: OMsignal

OMsignal is a shirt designed to be worn under regular clothing in daily use to measure different types of signals from a wearer’s body; Motion is detected using a 3-axis accelerometer, sensors woven directly into the polyester/lycra fabric of the shirt provide an an ECG signal, and a small GPS unit monitors location data.

Created by Frederic ChanayStephane Marceau and their team based out of Montreal, the shirt communicates to your mobile device via Bluetooth and allows for the tracking of heart rate, breathing patterns, calories burned, activity levels and even cues to your current emotional state throughout the day.

The shirt and bra being released for sale by the company are machine washable and have their sensors woven in them just below the chest to best collect ribcage extension/contraction breathing data and heart rate details. Housed in a hidden pocket a small unit encloses the accelerometer, GPS unit, and memory card storage in case connectivity to your mobile device is lost.

The company is working on an application allowing you to track your historical readings and privately share your data with your loved ones. Example scenarios for its use include sending your partner a comforting text message if you notice their stress levels are rising, or using it to remotely monitor an aging parent for signs of approaching health issues. 

The clothing's GPS capability can provide details on how your body is reacting to a certain environment. You might, for example, learn your stress levels are much higher while working from a coffee shop than from the office, or learn to avoid certain travel routes on your commute home if possible.

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More details about the system can be found at: Omsignal.com or by watching the teams product pitch in the video embedded below.

Related: Rest Devices, HexoSkin, Connected Body Products
Additional: Pando, VentureBeat, Medgadget