Twine : Listen to your world, talk to the Internet
Twine : Listen to your world, talk to the Internet
Twine : Listen to your world, talk to the Internet

Twine : Listen to your world, talk to the Internet

Twine is a a new way to connect your things to the internet. A project created by two MIT Media lab graduates (David Carr and John Kestner) and currently seeking funding on Kickstarter (Looking for $35,000 and ending on Jan 3rd 2012) the 2.5" object provides WiFi connectivity, internal and external sensors, and two AAA batteries that keep it running.

Where Twine really starts to shine is in its service backend where you can control and set up triggers to activate a palette of available conditions and actions (ala http://ifttt.com/) like sending out Text messages, Twitter posts, email, or even to Configure HTTP requests authorized based on the objects sensor activity and the rules and conditions you set.

An example of this is having your Twine text message you when your laundry is finished, or alerting you by email if moisture is detected on your basement floor.  The number of applications you can imagine with this device and the service is endless

 

Available sensors include:

  • Temperature sensor
  • Accelerometer
  • Magnetic switch
  • Moisture sensor (detect the presence of water)
  • Breakout board

Learn more about the project and its creators by visiting: http://supermechanical.com/

 

Designer Bios:

 

David Carr:

"David is a graduate of the MIT Media Lab, where he developed low-cost machines that enable personal digital fabrication and novel use of materials, in the Information Ecology group. Before that, he studied electrical engineering at Rice and worked as an engineer for Big Companies.

 

David is the recipient of a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship. He flies and builds planes."

 

John Kestner:

"John designed future consumer electronics and interfaces for humanizing data in the MIT Media Lab's Information Ecology group as a graduate student. Before that, he studied industrial design at Arizona State University and worked as an interaction designer and programmer for Big Companies.

 

John's work has appeared in the ID Annual Design Review, Ars Electronica, NPR, and the New York Times. He's not as tough as he looks in the photo"

 

Additional Notes:

- Cool Hunting Interview with one of its creators John Kestner

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